Tom Moore’s “Pathetic about Memory,” in a letter to Fanny

The life of John Keats the man: his family, his friends, and his contemporaries.

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Tom Moore’s “Pathetic about Memory,” in a letter to Fanny

Postby poemisdue » Wed Nov 11, 2020 4:36 am

I’ve just finished reading Keats’s letters to Fanny. The tenderness is so moving... having had my own Keats and Fanny moments, I was completely enthralled by the delicacy of their relationship, and could only wish to express myself on the level that Keats does :oops:

In the letter beginning with “The power of your benediction is of not so weak a nature...,” (page 41 for anyone with the Bright Star book) Keats says he could write a “song in the style of Tom Moore’s Pathetic about Memory.” So far I have not found the poem(?) he is referencing. Does anyone know what he might be referring to here?
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Re: Tom Moore’s “Pathetic about Memory,” in a letter to Fann

Postby CasaMagni » Wed Nov 11, 2020 12:28 pm

The word memory occurs 103 times in his Poetical Works -

https://books.googleusercontent.com/boo ... tnK7TKpb3g

but not in that form. Might be a case of Keats substituting the correct version with his own in order to chime with his train of thought in the letter.
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Re: Tom Moore’s “Pathetic about Memory,” in a letter to Fann

Postby Cathat906 » Wed Nov 11, 2020 2:49 pm

It might be "Farewell! But Whenever You Welcome the Hour" or another work by the Irish songwriter Thomas Moore.

http://www.folkworld.de/64/e/moore.html
http://www.contemplator.com/ireland/farewelc.html
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Re: Tom Moore’s “Pathetic about Memory,” in a letter to Fann

Postby Cathat906 » Sat Aug 21, 2021 11:08 am

Thomas Moore was an older contemporary of Keats and published his own epic poem an oriental romance (on Byron's advice) called Lalla Rookh in 1818, the same year as Endymion. Moore's poem at the time was very popular and he was paid £3,000 for it, a huge sum. There was real money to be made in epic poetry back then. Actually if you read both now, although Keat's work is arguably less consistent you can already see he is already the superior poet, something he demonstrates unequivocally in his later work. It's interesting how the reputations of poets like Moore and Barry Cornwall who were wildly popular during their lifetime, have faded and the works of poets who were relatively ignored like Keats, Clare and Blake now prevail.
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